Killer Corporations: numbers and economy

The Kassandra Project

 

It follows the list of the first 100 world largest corporations, extracted from “Global 500: The world’s largest corporations” by Fortune:
Rank Company Revenues ($ millions)
1 Wal-Mart Stores 351,139.0
  
2 Exxon Mobil 347,254.0
  
3 Royal Dutch Shell 318,845.0
  
4 BP 274,316.0
  
5 General Motors 207,349.0
  
6 Toyota Motor 204,746.4
  
7 Chevron 200,567.0
  
8 DaimlerChrysler 190,191.4
  
9 ConocoPhillips 172,451.0
  
10 Total 168,356.7
  
11 General Electric 168,307.0
  
12 Ford Motor 160,126.0
  
13 ING Group 158,274.3
  
14 Citigroup 146,777.0
  
15 AXA 139,738.1
  
16 Volkswagen 132,323.1
  
17 Sinopec 131,636.0
  
18 Crédit Agricole 128,481.3
  
19 Allianz 125,346.0
  
20 Fortis 121,201.8
  
21 Bank of America Corp. 117,017.0
  
22 HSBC Holdings 115,361.0
  
23 American International Group 113,194.0
  
24 China National Petroleum 110,520.2
  
25 BNP Paribas 109,213.6
  
……
Well, look who’s still riding high: Six of the top ten companies on this year’s list are pumping petroleum, and three more are making vehicles that burn it. True, Wal-Mart (Charts, Fortune 500) regained its title as the world’s largest company, with $351.1 billion in revenue.And thanks to a global M&A boom that paid out $11 billion in fees, the securities industry grew 45% by revenue in 2006. That lifted Morgan Stanley (No. 61), Merrill Lynch (No. 70), and Goldman Sachs (No. 72) into the top 75 for the first time.

But the big story was oil. Exxon Mobil (Charts, Fortune 500) (No. 2), fueled by high crude prices, was again the most profitable company in the world ($39.5 billion). The refining industry overall represented more than 14% of the Global 500’s $21 trillion in total revenue. That rising tide of petrodollars lifted a Chinese company, Sinopec (No. 17), into the top 20 for the first time. But for tech companies like Apple (Charts, Fortune 500) (No. 367), up a phenomenal 125 places on the list, it’s still a long way to the top.

Not all of the old-economy companies are doing well. Ford Motor (Charts, Fortune 500) (No. 12) fell out of the top ten for the first time in the Global 500’s 13-year history. Its revenues shrank 10%, and losses totaled $12.6 billion, making it the losingest company on the list this year. General Motors (Charts, Fortune 500) (No. 5) lost money too, and BP saw its profits decline 1.5% in a year when crude prices remained high. But Asia’s largest company, Toyota (No. 6), moved up two places and saw its profits rise 16% as customers flocked to its fuel-efficient and hybrid cars. If current trends persist, it should surpass GM next year to become the world’s largest automaker by revenue.

Total revenues for the Global 500 rose 10.4%, to nearly $21 trillion, and net income went up 25.9%, to $1.5 trillion. Neither grew as quickly as the previous year, but the profit margin of 7% was the highest ever.

Big Oil might dominate the top ten, but money dominates the top 25. Ten of those are financial services firms, led by Netherland’s ING Group (No. 13), followed by Citigroup (Charts, Fortune 500) (No. 14). Wall Street took advantage of low interest rates and well-funded private-equity firms to consummate $3.8 trillion worth of deals last year. “This has caused a windfall for the industry,” says Matthew Albrecht, S&P’s chief investment-banking analyst. “The merger boom increased both advisory fees and debt-lending and underwriting fees.” One of the biggest beneficiaries: Goldman Sachs, which saw its profits jump 70% last year.

It wasn’t just Wall Street reaping the benefits. Retail banking had a great year globally. European banks completed some of the biggest mergers in the continent’s history. Italy’s UniCredit Group (No. 97), Spain’s Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria (No. 163), and Germany’s Commerzbank (No. 216) all completed cross-border acquisitions. And Chinese banks, led by Industrial & Commercial Bank of China (No. 170), which boasted the world’s largest public offering in 2006, made a big splash. The Agricultural Bank of China (No. 277) saw its profits go up nearly fivefold as it cleaned up its balance sheet in preparation for a public listing.

In 1996 Steve Gorelick published a list of 100 top economies. Today The Kassandra Project will show a similar list based on these data:
This is the top 110 economies of the world in years 2005-2007 in $ Million:
United States 12.416.510,0
Japan 4.533.965,0
Germany 2.794.926,0
China 2.234.297,0
United Kingdom 2.198.789,0
France 2.126.630,0
Italy 1.762.519,0
Spain 1.124.640,0
Canada 1.113.810,0
India 805.713,8
Brazil 796.055,2
Korea, South 787.624,5
Mexico 768.437,5
Russia 763.720,0
Australia 732.499,2
Netherlands 624.202,2
Belgium 370.824,3
Switzerland 367.029,4
Turkey 362.501,7
Sweden 357.682,6
Wal-Mart Stores 351.139,0
Exxon Mobil 347.254,0
Royal Dutch Shell 318.845,0
Saudi Arabia 309.778,5
Austria 306.072,9
Poland 303.228,6
Norway 295.512,8
Indonesia 287.216,8
BP 274.316,0
Denmark 258.714,4
South Africa 239.543,2
Greece 225.206,3
General Motors 207.349,0
Toyota Motor 204.746,4
Ireland 201.816,9
Chevron 200.567,0
Finland 193.160,1
DaimlerChrysler 190.191,4
Iran 189.783,8
Portugal 183.304,8
Argentina 183.193,4
Hong Kong 177.702,6
Thailand 176.633,6
ConocoPhillips 172.451,0
Total 168.356,7
General Electric 168.307,0
Ford Motor 160.126,0
ING Group 158.274,3
Citigroup 146.777,0
Venezuela 140.191,9
AXA 139.738,1
Volkswagen 132.323,1
Sinopec 131.636,0
Malaysia 130.326,1
United Arab Emirates 129.701,6
Crédit Agricole 128.481,3
Allianz 125.346,0
Czech Republic 124.364,5
Israel 123.433,6
Colombia 122.308,6
Fortis 121.201,8
Bank of America Corp, 117.017,0
Singapore 116.763,7
HSBC Holdings 115.361,0
Chile 115.247,8
American International Group 113.194,0
Pakistan 110.732,1
China National Petroleum 110.520,2
New Zealand 109.291,4
Hungary 109.239,0
BNP Paribas 109.213,6
ENI 109.014,2
UBS 107.834,8
Siemens 107.341,7
State Grid 107.185,5
Algeria 102.255,9
Assicurazioni Generali 101.810,7
J,P, Morgan Chase & Co, 99.973,0
Philippines 99.029,4
Carrefour 99.014,7
Nigeria 98.950,5
Romania 98.565,4
Berkshire Hathaway 98.539,0
Pemex 97.469,3
Deutsche Bank 96.151,5
Dexia Group 95.846,6
Honda Motor 94.790,5
McKesson 93.574,0
Verizon Communications 93.221,0
Nippon Telegraph & Telephone 91.998,3
Hewlett-Packard 91.658,0
International Business Machines 91.424,0
Valero Energy 91.051,0
Home Depot 90.837,0
Nissan Motor 89.502,1
Samsung Electronics 89.476,2
Egypt 89.369,3
Credit Suisse 89.354,4
Hitachi 87.615,4
Société Générale 84.485,7
Aviva 83.487,0
Ukraine 82.876,3
Cardinal Health 81.895,1
Gazprom 81.115,0
E,ON 80.994,0
Royal Bank of Scotland 80.983,0
Kuwait 80.780,8
Tesco 79.978,8
Nestlé 79.872,1
Deutsche Post 79.502,2
There are 57 corporations in the first 110 economies: incredible! They represent the 51.8% of the list. In the next articles of “Killer Corporations” we’ll talk about the crimes which has been made by corporations to reach this numbers.

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